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Author Topic: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery  (Read 12303 times)

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Shawn

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Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« on: March 28, 2008, 06:25:58 PM »

Hmm, CNN posted a page today that's chock full of stuff on autism, mostly Asperger's, it seems. Very interesting...

Autism: Unraveling the Mystery

I find this story to be of particular interest...

Asperger's: My life as an Earthbound alien
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2008, 06:53:13 PM »

Time Magazine recommended Autism: The Musical. I missed it because I wasn't sure I had HBO or not (because TV is obviously bad for you and that's why I rarely use the flat screen TV my parental units bought).

I dislike how I've lost two semesters worth of useful electives because of my "problem" (that is, I had to go to SDI because I have Aspergers because my 3rd grade teacher had the genius idea of having me diagnosed, and this state was awful gitty about requirements for "special" children. And then I was able to get my electives back, but all the classes were filled up  :violent5:).

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2008, 07:42:59 PM »

Have anyone here seen that movie named "Mozart and the Whale" it is a pretty good movie about a couple that fall in love but both of them have asperger.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2008, 10:58:16 PM »


I dislike how I've lost two semesters worth of useful electives because of my "problem" (that is, I had to go to SDI because I have Aspergers because my 3rd grade teacher had the genius idea of having me diagnosed, and this state was awful gitty about requirements for "special" children. And then I was able to get my electives back, but all the classes were filled up  :violent5:).

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)

How seriously does this affect your social life and interactions? How differently do you think someone with Aspergers should be treated in a social situation? Or at all differently?
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2008, 11:59:00 PM »

autism: the musical is spectacular.  they screened it at the coolidge corner theater last semester - we got bonus points in my speech class if we went and saw it. 
autism fascinates me, and is one of the many (many, many) fields i'm considering.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2008, 12:23:03 AM »


I dislike how I've lost two semesters worth of useful electives because of my "problem" (that is, I had to go to SDI because I have Aspergers because my 3rd grade teacher had the genius idea of having me diagnosed, and this state was awful gitty about requirements for "special" children. And then I was able to get my electives back, but all the classes were filled up  :violent5:).

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)

How seriously does this affect your social life and interactions? How differently do you think someone with Aspergers should be treated in a social situation? Or at all differently?

I think my social life is pretty normal because I'm a borderline case. I don't have trouble engaging conversations or anything like that, although some of the more "typical" cases would be different.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2008, 01:16:11 AM »


I dislike how I've lost two semesters worth of useful electives because of my "problem" (that is, I had to go to SDI because I have Aspergers because my 3rd grade teacher had the genius idea of having me diagnosed, and this state was awful gitty about requirements for "special" children. And then I was able to get my electives back, but all the classes were filled up  :violent5:).

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)

How seriously does this affect your social life and interactions? How differently do you think someone with Aspergers should be treated in a social situation? Or at all differently?

I think my social life is pretty normal because I'm a borderline case. I don't have trouble engaging conversations or anything like that, although some of the more "typical" cases would be different.

Has small talk ever bothered you, or have you had a tendency to just go for the deep stuff when conversing?
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2008, 01:39:53 PM »

Well, shit. I do that.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2008, 11:36:36 PM »

See Wyatt, if they'd invented all this shit when you and I were in grade school...
-you'd have been a much less interesting, yet more medicated person, and
-I'd probably be a CEO of a large corporation, with a nice wife, a couple of kids ready to start college,
and a house in the 'burbs.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2008, 01:32:41 AM »

Yeah... no shit. I'm glad they left me to medicate myself on my own terms.

[/joke]


Seriously though. The headmaster of Potomac Country Day School "diagnosed" me as being autistic when I was seven. He collected owls, kept three great danes, wore a beard, and had no psychology, psychiatric or medical credentials. It seems I stared out the window a lot in class. Well... there were birds. I also spent a lot of time wondering about things. The universe. What is "nothing"?

Yeah, they'd have medicated me in this age. Crazy shit.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2008, 10:29:26 AM »

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)

Have you read the book Magical Thinking by Augusten Bourroughs yet? His brother has Asperger's, and is a textbook case. Augusten talks about him in a couple chapters, and makes an observation that I find really keen. Asperger's is a disease that people LOVE because the person "afflicted" (I'm loathe to use that word, but I'm sort of half-asleep...) generally turns out to be a genius. Very very talented in one area. People get very proud when their children are diagnosed, so most of them tend to push towards that diagnosis. The parents, unfortunately, play a very large role in the diagnosis of their children because some of the kids can't or won't describe how they feel, causing the whole diagnosis-happy thing. My cousin has Asperger's as well, and he is an extremely talented artist for his age. The way he draws is fascinating, and I'm wondering if you do the same thing. If he's drawing a horse, he'll draw first the hooves, then the ears, then the tail, then the legs, then the eyes, then the body, then the head. Everything is unconnected until the last moment, and everything is perfectly proportioned. I draw in a similar fashion, but not as disconnected. He was unable to learn english when he was a kid, so he and his family learned sign language instead. I only remember a few words from that, like "snow," and "tiger." But I didn't speak until late as well. I also have a difficult time making eye contact and expressing emotions, and I feel very very disconnected from the world.

Autism is really, really, really interesting to me. I wrote a couple papers on it in my psych classes. Asperger's is interesting as well, but mostly because I identify with it. I don't really think that I have it, I just have Med School Syndrome (you know, where you read a description of an affliction and go "omg i have that!").
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2008, 11:32:17 AM »

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)

Have you read the book Magical Thinking by Augusten Bourroughs yet?

ASS BURGER.

My cousin worked in a home for autistic children once and now she's a school teacher. The stories were amazing and I liked them and she sometimes joked that I was autistic. Maybe I am...or have Asperger's Syndrome. I dunno.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2008, 11:38:37 AM »

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)

Have you read the book Magical Thinking by Augusten Bourroughs yet?

ASS BURGER.

My cousin worked in a home for autistic children once and now she's a school teacher. The stories were amazing and I liked them and she sometimes joked that I was autistic. Maybe I am...or have Asperger's Syndrome. I dunno.

HEHEHE yeah. That chapter was awesome.  :D
When we went over it in Abnormal Psych, the teacher (normally a very serious man) said "Yes, I really did say Ass Burger."
You're probably not. Perhaps you and I have a new form of AssBurger, one that is slightly less severe. This way, we can get drugs and therapy and stuff too!!!!  :D
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2008, 11:43:00 AM »

I count being diagnosed with Asperger's as being another symptom of America being too diagnosis/medication happy. Sooner or later I make friends XP
Plus being told I have bad motor skills is terrible for my self-esteem (they put me in adaptive PE last year too, thank goodness for moving house, eh?)

Have you read the book Magical Thinking by Augusten Bourroughs yet?

ASS BURGER.

My cousin worked in a home for autistic children once and now she's a school teacher. The stories were amazing and I liked them and she sometimes joked that I was autistic. Maybe I am...or have Asperger's Syndrome. I dunno.

HEHEHE yeah. That chapter was awesome.  :D
When we went over it in Abnormal Psych, the teacher (normally a very serious man) said "Yes, I really did say Ass Burger."
You're probably not. Perhaps you and I have a new form of AssBurger, one that is slightly less severe. This way, we can get drugs and therapy and stuff too!!!!  :D

BRAP! Represent the new form of AssBurger.

I totally didn't know it was pronounced that way. I always said (ass-pur-jer). I thought the G was soft.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2008, 05:30:02 PM »

Have anyone here seen that movie named "Mozart and the Whale" it is a pretty good movie about a couple that fall in love but both of them have asperger.

I love that movie.

I'm an Aspergers child. I'm getting a lot better, but I'm still not very good in social situations. I speak what's on my mind, without much of a censorship going on, and it makes people uncomfortable..nevermind that I can't pick up the normal body language thing where you know they mean one thing when they say another thing..so I'm often told I'm gullible. Arg. But I've developed ways of analyzing people as if they were objects to help me know when I'm supposed to catch something. I'm fairly good at starting conversations, especially if we have common interests, I can go on and on about things I like.

When I was a kid though, I was really weird. I'm happy I've found bits of myself lying around and got to be human a bit.

Having Aspergers, for me, is like being in a bath, with your vision all wiggly from the water, and muffled sounds coming from the outside world, but not being able to quite get the whole picture.

end blab
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2008, 05:35:54 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over
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Shawn

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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2008, 06:35:00 PM »

BRAP!

Brap is a term coined by the members of the band Skinny Puppy, and they define it as a verb meaning "to get together, hook up electronic instruments, get high, and record".

Regarding autism and Asperger's, I had a very good reason for posting the links that I did.  I wanted to see the views of the members on the board, and also to see if there were any Aspies present, because...

I have Asperger's. I was diagnosed several years before it was included in the DSM-IV. Contrary to what some may think, I do not feel that it is "cool" to have Asperger's. I am glad that I am unique and an individual, and frankly do not want there to ever be a "cure" for Asperger's or other high-fuinctioning forms of autism, but I have had no shortage of problems in my life due to AS.

I've always had an issue with arrogance and condescension, but it wasn't because I was consciously trying to be a jerk and put people down. It was just who I was, but until my mother told me how other people perceived my behavior, at which point I was already about 21, no one had seen fit to tell me that my behavior was inappropriate. They were just content to think that I was dick. Since the time that my mother told me, I've been very self-conscious about my behavior, because now I am all too aware that I might slip up, and unintentionally offend someone, which has happened plenty of times, including at least a couple of this board.

I've not had the pleasure of retaining any friends from my childhood. In fact, until about four years ago, I hadn't been able to retain any friends at all for very long, much of that due to my behavior. Speaking of that, I'm going to address, point-by-point, the things brought up in one of those articles...

Quote
Engaging in one-sided, long-winded conversations, without noticing if the listener is listening or trying to change the subject

Ohhh, yeah. I had trouble with this for a very long time, and I'm sure that I bored many people to tears. I still do it sometimes, but now I'm pretty mindful of it, and will ask the person with whom I'm speaking if I should either stop talking or change the subject.

Quote
Displaying unusual nonverbal communication, such as lack of eye contact, few facial expressions, or awkward body postures and gestures

I often display a complete lack of non-verbal signals, which apparently confuses the heck out of a lot of people. I used to have trouble with eye contact, but now I'm quite good at it.

Quote
Showing an intense obsession with one or two specific, narrow subjects, such as baseball statistics, train schedules, weather or snakes

Well, I guess that I used to have this issue, but not so much anymore, though there is one thing that I really love that would stress most people out: research. In fact, I use research as an escape, a little too often, unfortunately.

Quote
Appearing not to understand, empathize with, or be sensitive to others' feelings

Appearances can be deceiving. Just because I don't look like I empathize or understand doesn't mean that that's necessarily the case. Unfortunately, a rather unempathetic and unsympathetic and attitude has caused issues in my last two relationships, especially the most recent one. In fact, my Aspie nature helped to destroy said relationship, but I'll address that later, perhaps. Still, how would you feel if you knew that it was your very nature that cost you someone who you loved with all of your heart and soul?

Quote
Having a hard time "reading" other people or understanding humor

Oh, boy, yeah, I had major trouble with that when I was younger. For me, the ability to read people is not something that came naturally. I had to learn it. I'm still not as proficient as a natural reader, but it's certainly helped with my social interactions.

Quote
# Speaking in a voice that is monotonous, rigid or unusually fast

Oh, me of the monotone. They actually gave me speech therapy for that during my sophomore year of high school. Hahaha. I still speak in somewhat of a monotone, but I've had enough practice with adding inflection that it's become natural. However, I'm still occasionally asked if I'm okay, due to said monotone and my lack of facial expression.

Quote
Moving clumsily, with poor coordination

Well, I'm not going to be a surgeon, not that I'd want to be, but I don't think that this is even close to an issue anymore. I'm sure that most here would agree with that if they saw me on a dance floor.

Quote
Having an odd posture or a rigid gait

I'm not entirely sure what this means, but I don't believe that it's an issue.

I've been looking for a way to bring all of this up, but couldn't really find the right avenue, until CNN posted that page, and I am glad that they did.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2008, 06:45:26 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2008, 06:50:30 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2008, 01:13:49 AM »

I have a friend with Aspergers, she's very odd and I'm trying to understand her and what she does and it is very difficult for me. She seems to have attached herself to me and is very interested in me, I hope it's not romantic because I do not reciprocate the feeling. I guess it's nothing I need to understand or know, but I don't know- I don't get much out of the time we spend together and I figure if I do then I can learn how to communicate to her in a way that's valuable for me too. I understand Aspergers to some extent. She gave me a book to read and I thought it was a bunch of crap at first, because I saw a lot of myself in it. but it was just a lot of social problems stacked on top of each other and amplified to some extent. And I REALLY hope I don't offend by that statement- I just had trouble seeing the validity in Aspergers and how it's a "disease".
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2008, 02:21:29 AM »

I have a friend with Aspergers, she's very odd and I'm trying to understand her and what she does and it is very difficult for me. She seems to have attached herself to me and is very interested in me, I hope it's not romantic because I do not reciprocate the feeling. I guess it's nothing I need to understand or know, but I don't know- I don't get much out of the time we spend together and I figure if I do then I can learn how to communicate to her in a way that's valuable for me too. I understand Aspergers to some extent. She gave me a book to read and I thought it was a bunch of crap at first, because I saw a lot of myself in it. but it was just a lot of social problems stacked on top of each other and amplified to some extent. And I REALLY hope I don't offend by that statement- I just had trouble seeing the validity in Aspergers and how it's a "disease".

As some would put it, it's not a disease, it's a personality type. Seriously, how are you going to cure the way a person interacts and reacts to the world around them? It's not something that you catch. It's not something that medication will make better, though that might assist with the side order of disorders that some of us get. We just are what we are, and no pills or shots are going to change that.

By the way, I'd recommend the book An Asperger Marriage, by Chris and Gisela Slater-Walker. It gives better insights into Asperger's than I can.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2008, 08:56:32 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.

I don't know what's wrong with me. I don't like to make eye contact with people, I don't get jokes at all (well some, but not the most obvious ones because first I process the joke in my head to a point where I break it down. Then I try to make it sound like a joke but I don't get shit. So it kind of sucks when everyone else is in a different topic and I "get it" 30 minutes later. Though the joke is kind of dumb. I pretend to laugh and get it, when I don't.). I don't cry at funerals, I have litte to no feelings for things. I'm not an asshole, I swear. It's just that I didn't know the person that well, I wasn't that close to that person. Why should I cry? My grandma died when I was 7, but at the time I didn't understand what death was. My uncle died of cancer when I was 13, but I only saw him 3 times a year. Then during his final months we saw him everyday, but he was usually high off his meds and cussing people out so it was a bit hard. So a lot of people were asking me why I didn't cry at the funeral, I was the only one. I didn't like going to the funeral, I was just happy that I didn't have to go to school for a week. That's a really harsh and cold thing to say, but that's honestly how I felt. Trying to fit in, when everone was gone I went beside the body and started talking to it so no one would question my distance.

I associate patterns and colours to help me remember things. I think that's called synesthesia. Except I don't see the colours when someone's talking to me or when I listen to music. Normally I see shapes, patterns, some colours when I listen to music. When I listen to music I see a wave of colour that looks very much like that machine that measures heart beats. So imagine that going to the beat of the song in a specific colour. Sometimes there is no colour. Certain words are shapes, and colours. Like the word "year" for instance. I see an orange oval with black Vs in the middle. Like this:
I would draw more but I kind of don't want to.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2008, 10:30:42 PM »

Bah. I hate this shit. I was diagnosed at 14 and none of the shit I've seen really applies to me, so fuck this. (Sorry, had to let it out.)

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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2008, 03:14:50 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.

I don't know what's wrong with me. I don't like to make eye contact with people, I don't get jokes at all (well some, but not the most obvious ones because first I process the joke in my head to a point where I break it down. Then I try to make it sound like a joke but I don't get shit. So it kind of sucks when everyone else is in a different topic and I "get it" 30 minutes later. Though the joke is kind of dumb. I pretend to laugh and get it, when I don't.). I don't cry at funerals, I have litte to no feelings for things. I'm not an asshole, I swear. It's just that I didn't know the person that well, I wasn't that close to that person. Why should I cry? My grandma died when I was 7, but at the time I didn't understand what death was. My uncle died of cancer when I was 13, but I only saw him 3 times a year. Then during his final months we saw him everyday, but he was usually high off his meds and cussing people out so it was a bit hard. So a lot of people were asking me why I didn't cry at the funeral, I was the only one. I didn't like going to the funeral, I was just happy that I didn't have to go to school for a week. That's a really harsh and cold thing to say, but that's honestly how I felt. Trying to fit in, when everone was gone I went beside the body and started talking to it so no one would question my distance.

I associate patterns and colours to help me remember things. I think that's called synesthesia. Except I don't see the colours when someone's talking to me or when I listen to music. Normally I see shapes, patterns, some colours when I listen to music. When I listen to music I see a wave of colour that looks very much like that machine that measures heart beats. So imagine that going to the beat of the song in a specific colour. Sometimes there is no colour. Certain words are shapes, and colours. Like the word "year" for instance. I see an orange oval with black Vs in the middle. Like this:
I would draw more but I kind of don't want to.

Sean, there are many different types of synesthesia. I have an online friend in Rochester who experiences lexical-gustatory synesthesia, meaning that she can taste words. In fact, I'm going to post a link to a post that she typed on her MySpace blog which has probably the best description of Asperger's that I've ever read...

The Woman Who Fell to Earth

Bah. I hate this shit. I was diagnosed at 14 and none of the shit I've seen really applies to me, so fuck this. (Sorry, had to let it out.)

How old are you now, and why do you feel that none of it applies to you?
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #24 on: May 01, 2008, 04:59:18 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.

I don't know what's wrong with me. I don't like to make eye contact with people, I don't get jokes at all (well some, but not the most obvious ones because first I process the joke in my head to a point where I break it down. Then I try to make it sound like a joke but I don't get shit. So it kind of sucks when everyone else is in a different topic and I "get it" 30 minutes later. Though the joke is kind of dumb. I pretend to laugh and get it, when I don't.). I don't cry at funerals, I have litte to no feelings for things. I'm not an asshole, I swear. It's just that I didn't know the person that well, I wasn't that close to that person. Why should I cry? My grandma died when I was 7, but at the time I didn't understand what death was. My uncle died of cancer when I was 13, but I only saw him 3 times a year. Then during his final months we saw him everyday, but he was usually high off his meds and cussing people out so it was a bit hard. So a lot of people were asking me why I didn't cry at the funeral, I was the only one. I didn't like going to the funeral, I was just happy that I didn't have to go to school for a week. That's a really harsh and cold thing to say, but that's honestly how I felt. Trying to fit in, when everone was gone I went beside the body and started talking to it so no one would question my distance.

I associate patterns and colours to help me remember things. I think that's called synesthesia. Except I don't see the colours when someone's talking to me or when I listen to music. Normally I see shapes, patterns, some colours when I listen to music. When I listen to music I see a wave of colour that looks very much like that machine that measures heart beats. So imagine that going to the beat of the song in a specific colour. Sometimes there is no colour. Certain words are shapes, and colours. Like the word "year" for instance. I see an orange oval with black Vs in the middle. Like this:
I would draw more but I kind of don't want to.

Sean, there are many different types of synesthesia. I have an online friend in Rochester who experiences lexical-gustatory synesthesia, meaning that she can taste words. In fact, I'm going to post a link to a post that she typed on her MySpace blog which has probably the best description of Asperger's that I've ever read...

The Woman Who Fell to Earth


I know there's differne't types of synesthesia. Although I've never been diagnosed with anything, I strangely relate to some things that a person with Asperger's would have.

When I was younger I had to see a lot of school counsellors to talk to me because I was very anti-social, shy, and possessed "loner" qualities. I was also very damn violent with other kids. A lot of them said it was just a phase. I was bullied A LOT, so the school had to call my parents in case I became suicidal and that they'd made a decision to put me in counselling to find out what's wrong with me and why kids hated me so much. But none of them said anything, just that I was uber smart and creative and all the other kids weren't as unique as I, that's why I coudln't socialize well with others. I also thought that others experienced the same things I saw in my head so that sort of contributed to the bullying because of the weird shit I saw. But it's not like I was high when I was 6.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2008, 05:30:35 PM »

I'm not qualified to make a diagnosis, but from what you've described, it's possible that you have some form of high-functioning autism. I guess the next question would be, would you want an official diagnosis if that's actually the case?
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2008, 05:46:34 PM »


Oh my lordy! I would love to be diagnosed, then it wouldn't occupy my mind so much. I wouldn't drift away from life so many hours in the day then get punished by nearly every teacher in sight. It would allow me to live and not watch my every move and make sure what I'm doing is normal. Am I talking to loud to this stranger? Am I expressing little or too much emotion? If I was diagnosed I wouldn't have to worry anymore about this.

You wanna know something else? I can taste the colour brown. But that only happens once in a while. Usually when I'm sick, I get this strange coppery taste in the back of my mouth and for some reason Brown pops in my head. It's never green or yellow, it's always Brown. So now I'm going to research some stuff just for the sake of knowing. Maybe I'll ask my doctor what's wrong.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2008, 06:45:04 PM »

I thought that all I had was low self-esteem before I opened this thread, with a dash of OCD.
Then I opened it
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #28 on: May 01, 2008, 07:04:39 PM »

Be careful with the self-diagnosis' folks. Obviously Shawn has been through the process, but just because you can "relate" to some of the symptoms doesn't mean you have a particular condition.

I relate to a lot of what Shawn described. But I'd never go as far as to say I have that condition, because I don't have compulsions (i.e. lack of control). That is what truely drives a diagnosis in my opinion...how much control you have over the condition. Do you not make eye contact because it's how you developed socially? Or do you not because to do so causes you extreme physical discomfort, to the point where you have to look away.

I mean, "Socially awkward" might be the term best suited for a lot of this stuff. I know I describe myself as such all the time. Lets not start throwing around a serious condition just to give our uniqueness a name shall we?  :)

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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #29 on: May 01, 2008, 08:08:57 PM »

Be careful with the self-diagnosis' folks. Obviously Shawn has been through the process, but just because you can "relate" to some of the symptoms doesn't mean you have a particular condition.

True, but one should be careful with official diagnoses as well. Despite more and more being uncovered about autism every year, there are still some venues where the mere knowledge that someone has Asperger's (or another ASD) might cause difficulties. For example, I used to post to an Aspie board (until I was banned by the site admin for sticking up for another admin's actions, but that's a different story), and we had several people who were self-diagnosed, but felt that they couldn't afford to go for one, including one guy who, the last I knew, had a job at the US Department of Defense, and felt that he would find himself without a job not long after getting something done officially. No one would really suspect, because he has movie star good looks, and without any makeup necessary! It's not that he felt that they would discriminate against him, but that they would start second-guessing his work and performance solely because he has Asperger's.

Quote
I relate to a lot of what Shawn described. But I'd never go as far as to say I have that condition, because I don't have compulsions (i.e. lack of control). That is what truely drives a diagnosis in my opinion...how much control you have over the condition. Do you not make eye contact because it's how you developed socially? Or do you not because to do so causes you extreme physical discomfort, to the point where you have to look away.

I have a cousin that still has trouble with eye contact, and she's slightly older than I am, and my brother used to flap his hands when he got excited, but I don't think that he's done that in at least 15 years, and it hasn't affected his life as much as it has mine, as when he's discharged from the US Marine Corps on May 12, he will have served about 8 2/3 years. Over his life, my father has displayed behaviors similar to mine, but he didn't have the benefit of an Asperger's diagnosis as a child, and back then, autistic children were often thought of retarded, and locked up in institutions. My father may not be a genius, but he's not an unintelligent man, and has had little issue keeping himself employed most of his adult life, including one job where he was earning about $60K per year just before he retired. I've also heard that aside from being less authoritarian, he was a lot like his father, so I can conceivably trace Asperger's back at least two generations.

Quote
I mean, "Socially awkward" might be the term best suited for a lot of this stuff. I know I describe myself as such all the time. Lets not start throwing around a serious condition just to give our uniqueness a name shall we?  :)

Agreed.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #30 on: May 01, 2008, 09:05:21 PM »

I have a few doctors and social workers in my family, many who think I should get "tested" for autism. What do they do anyway? Ask questions?
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #31 on: May 01, 2008, 09:37:53 PM »

I have a few doctors and social workers in my family, many who think I should get "tested" for autism. What do they do anyway? Ask questions?

Well, questions are a part of it, but one is also given a series of short tests. You should see if you can get an unofficial diagnosis first before deciding on whether or not you want it to become official. I'm not sure how Canada is regarding benefits, but here in the US, depending on your current economic status, one may be eligible to receive SSI, SSD, Medicaid, and/or other benefits.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #32 on: May 02, 2008, 08:40:34 PM »

I have a few doctors and social workers in my family, many who think I should get "tested" for autism. What do they do anyway? Ask questions?

Well, questions are a part of it, but one is also given a series of short tests. You should see if you can get an unofficial diagnosis first before deciding on whether or not you want it to become official. I'm not sure how Canada is regarding benefits, but here in the US, depending on your current economic status, one may be eligible to receive SSI, SSD, Medicaid, and/or other benefits.

True, we get many benefits. We also get medicated marijuana for depression.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #33 on: May 03, 2008, 02:29:01 PM »

I have a few doctors and social workers in my family, many who think I should get "tested" for autism. What do they do anyway? Ask questions?

Well, questions are a part of it, but one is also given a series of short tests. You should see if you can get an unofficial diagnosis first before deciding on whether or not you want it to become official. I'm not sure how Canada is regarding benefits, but here in the US, depending on your current economic status, one may be eligible to receive SSI, SSD, Medicaid, and/or other benefits.

True, we get many benefits. We also get medicated marijuana for depression.

Marijuana for depression? I thought that it was only for cancer patients and those with terminal diseases.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #34 on: May 03, 2008, 07:13:20 PM »

I have a few doctors and social workers in my family, many who think I should get "tested" for autism. What do they do anyway? Ask questions?

Well, questions are a part of it, but one is also given a series of short tests. You should see if you can get an unofficial diagnosis first before deciding on whether or not you want it to become official. I'm not sure how Canada is regarding benefits, but here in the US, depending on your current economic status, one may be eligible to receive SSI, SSD, Medicaid, and/or other benefits.

True, we get many benefits. We also get medicated marijuana for depression.

Marijuana for depression? I thought that it was only for cancer patients and those with terminal diseases.

Oh yes, MJ for depression. People with cancer! Ha! You've got to be kidding me, some patients get heroin in small doses of course. Marijuana, that only gets you numb, it doesn't take any pain away. My uncle was a cancer patient, he was high off morphine during his last few weeks.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #35 on: May 04, 2008, 11:08:44 AM »

Seean, it's not intended to take away pain, it's intended to take away some of the side effects of radiation treatment (eg: nausea).

And, actually, I find it takes away pain. I need serious pain meds when I get cramps (read: oxycontin), and if I were to smoke a bowl, I'd just need advil. It'd be a pretty sweet deal if I was a stoner.  ;D

(But for depression? In all my life, all the people I've known with depression or BP or any sort of chemical imbalance that smoked pot were worse off than before. You should meet my sister, it f*cked her life up... Not because it's weed, but because she's self-medicating...)
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #36 on: May 04, 2008, 12:11:31 PM »

Seean, it's not intended to take away pain, it's intended to take away some of the side effects of radiation treatment (eg: nausea).

I guess it would depend on who's using it. It makes some people numb and some people's emotions and pains much more amplified. I remember how I kept hitting my new pierced ear and didn't even realize it until after everything died down I could feel the pain throbbing in my lobe.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #37 on: June 20, 2008, 11:06:05 PM »

There's a lot of new war veterans getting perscription weed now, too. Mostly for PTSD.

As for autism, there has been a lot of recent progress, but it's going to take years for it to reach most people. My old high school used to treat autistic kids and retarded kids the same way, though there are specific nuances to each disorder that need to be addressed on a person-to-person basis. All of the mentally handicapped kids are uaully grouped together, and kind of pushed through the curriculum, whether they retain the information legally required or not. Which is easy for everyone, but it means they're royally screwed later on.

The truth is, people don't really know what to 'do' with these people, and either they get pushed too hard or not at all, both of with impede development. The worst is when people look at a diagnosis, and just assume that a person is incapable of anything without someone to hold their hand. Most of the symptoms of aspergers are experienced by everyone, anyway. The inability to communicate exactly what one feels, or to understand everything that is occuring, a disconnection from other people, those are universal problems in the developed world. Asbergers is just a magnification of those problems, for the most part.

Ps- i don't know if these have been mentioned before, but 'The Curions Incident of the Dog in the Night Time' is an excellent read regarding this subject. So is 'The Stranger'. I know it wasn't written specifically about autisum/aspergers, but it is my own personal conspiracy theory that Merusault is autistic. Whether he is or not, he exhibits many of the symptoms, in a way that someone normal would. Which is chilling, if you know the story.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #38 on: June 22, 2008, 01:29:01 AM »

They should give weed for severe migraines.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #39 on: September 10, 2008, 05:02:26 AM »

Ps- i don't know if these have been mentioned before, but 'The Curions Incident of the Dog in the Night Time' is an excellent read regarding this subject. So is 'The Stranger'. I know it wasn't written specifically about autisum/aspergers, but it is my own personal conspiracy theory that Merusault is autistic. Whether he is or not, he exhibits many of the symptoms, in a way that someone normal would. Which is chilling, if you know the story.

It's the book on which The Cure's Killing an Arab is based. I actually haven't read it as of yet, but I do own a copy.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #40 on: September 10, 2008, 08:20:44 PM »

(But for depression? In all my life, all the people I've known with depression or BP or any sort of chemical imbalance that smoked pot were worse off than before.

That's pretty much what I've seen too. I have seen and experienced stress reduction, with marijuana, but it would only be practical for sleep over stress therapy because of its impact on waking functionality. Actually, it can be a rather effective sleep aid in many individuals. I don't know how it works with migraines, but weed will make a sinus headache worse.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #41 on: December 28, 2008, 04:26:53 PM »

I have a few doctors and social workers in my family, many who think I should get "tested" for autism. What do they do anyway? Ask questions?
There are different ways to figure out that someone has autism. For me, my mother heard someone talking about it (I have aspgergers) and she sad this sounded like me. We met with a few doctors and they confirmed everything. Honestly though, since its still new, people have ah ard time figureing it out.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #42 on: December 28, 2008, 04:31:12 PM »

(But for depression? In all my life, all the people I've known with depression or BP or any sort of chemical imbalance that smoked pot were worse off than before.

That's pretty much what I've seen too. I have seen and experienced stress reduction, with marijuana, but it would only be practical for sleep over stress therapy because of its impact on waking functionality. Actually, it can be a rather effective sleep aid in many individuals. I don't know how it works with migraines, but weed will make a sinus headache worse.

I can speak to the sleeping aid. I actually use it for that fairly consistantly.

Stress reduction? Only with minor stress. Major stress, it gets ten times worse...at least for anyone with a tendancy towards anxiety.

In terms of pain reduction, I found it works best for dull, overall body pains. I feel better if I smoke while sick, or if I'm sore from some sort of physical activity. Something specific and sharp won't get abated, it'll probably seem worse. My roomate smoked before getting a tattoo once...just a horrible, horrible idea in terms of his ability to manage and deal with his pain.
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