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Author Topic: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery  (Read 12302 times)

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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2008, 05:35:54 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2008, 06:35:00 PM »

BRAP!

Brap is a term coined by the members of the band Skinny Puppy, and they define it as a verb meaning "to get together, hook up electronic instruments, get high, and record".

Regarding autism and Asperger's, I had a very good reason for posting the links that I did.  I wanted to see the views of the members on the board, and also to see if there were any Aspies present, because...

I have Asperger's. I was diagnosed several years before it was included in the DSM-IV. Contrary to what some may think, I do not feel that it is "cool" to have Asperger's. I am glad that I am unique and an individual, and frankly do not want there to ever be a "cure" for Asperger's or other high-fuinctioning forms of autism, but I have had no shortage of problems in my life due to AS.

I've always had an issue with arrogance and condescension, but it wasn't because I was consciously trying to be a jerk and put people down. It was just who I was, but until my mother told me how other people perceived my behavior, at which point I was already about 21, no one had seen fit to tell me that my behavior was inappropriate. They were just content to think that I was dick. Since the time that my mother told me, I've been very self-conscious about my behavior, because now I am all too aware that I might slip up, and unintentionally offend someone, which has happened plenty of times, including at least a couple of this board.

I've not had the pleasure of retaining any friends from my childhood. In fact, until about four years ago, I hadn't been able to retain any friends at all for very long, much of that due to my behavior. Speaking of that, I'm going to address, point-by-point, the things brought up in one of those articles...

Quote
Engaging in one-sided, long-winded conversations, without noticing if the listener is listening or trying to change the subject

Ohhh, yeah. I had trouble with this for a very long time, and I'm sure that I bored many people to tears. I still do it sometimes, but now I'm pretty mindful of it, and will ask the person with whom I'm speaking if I should either stop talking or change the subject.

Quote
Displaying unusual nonverbal communication, such as lack of eye contact, few facial expressions, or awkward body postures and gestures

I often display a complete lack of non-verbal signals, which apparently confuses the heck out of a lot of people. I used to have trouble with eye contact, but now I'm quite good at it.

Quote
Showing an intense obsession with one or two specific, narrow subjects, such as baseball statistics, train schedules, weather or snakes

Well, I guess that I used to have this issue, but not so much anymore, though there is one thing that I really love that would stress most people out: research. In fact, I use research as an escape, a little too often, unfortunately.

Quote
Appearing not to understand, empathize with, or be sensitive to others' feelings

Appearances can be deceiving. Just because I don't look like I empathize or understand doesn't mean that that's necessarily the case. Unfortunately, a rather unempathetic and unsympathetic and attitude has caused issues in my last two relationships, especially the most recent one. In fact, my Aspie nature helped to destroy said relationship, but I'll address that later, perhaps. Still, how would you feel if you knew that it was your very nature that cost you someone who you loved with all of your heart and soul?

Quote
Having a hard time "reading" other people or understanding humor

Oh, boy, yeah, I had major trouble with that when I was younger. For me, the ability to read people is not something that came naturally. I had to learn it. I'm still not as proficient as a natural reader, but it's certainly helped with my social interactions.

Quote
# Speaking in a voice that is monotonous, rigid or unusually fast

Oh, me of the monotone. They actually gave me speech therapy for that during my sophomore year of high school. Hahaha. I still speak in somewhat of a monotone, but I've had enough practice with adding inflection that it's become natural. However, I'm still occasionally asked if I'm okay, due to said monotone and my lack of facial expression.

Quote
Moving clumsily, with poor coordination

Well, I'm not going to be a surgeon, not that I'd want to be, but I don't think that this is even close to an issue anymore. I'm sure that most here would agree with that if they saw me on a dance floor.

Quote
Having an odd posture or a rigid gait

I'm not entirely sure what this means, but I don't believe that it's an issue.

I've been looking for a way to bring all of this up, but couldn't really find the right avenue, until CNN posted that page, and I am glad that they did.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2008, 06:45:26 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2008, 06:50:30 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2008, 01:13:49 AM »

I have a friend with Aspergers, she's very odd and I'm trying to understand her and what she does and it is very difficult for me. She seems to have attached herself to me and is very interested in me, I hope it's not romantic because I do not reciprocate the feeling. I guess it's nothing I need to understand or know, but I don't know- I don't get much out of the time we spend together and I figure if I do then I can learn how to communicate to her in a way that's valuable for me too. I understand Aspergers to some extent. She gave me a book to read and I thought it was a bunch of crap at first, because I saw a lot of myself in it. but it was just a lot of social problems stacked on top of each other and amplified to some extent. And I REALLY hope I don't offend by that statement- I just had trouble seeing the validity in Aspergers and how it's a "disease".
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2008, 02:21:29 AM »

I have a friend with Aspergers, she's very odd and I'm trying to understand her and what she does and it is very difficult for me. She seems to have attached herself to me and is very interested in me, I hope it's not romantic because I do not reciprocate the feeling. I guess it's nothing I need to understand or know, but I don't know- I don't get much out of the time we spend together and I figure if I do then I can learn how to communicate to her in a way that's valuable for me too. I understand Aspergers to some extent. She gave me a book to read and I thought it was a bunch of crap at first, because I saw a lot of myself in it. but it was just a lot of social problems stacked on top of each other and amplified to some extent. And I REALLY hope I don't offend by that statement- I just had trouble seeing the validity in Aspergers and how it's a "disease".

As some would put it, it's not a disease, it's a personality type. Seriously, how are you going to cure the way a person interacts and reacts to the world around them? It's not something that you catch. It's not something that medication will make better, though that might assist with the side order of disorders that some of us get. We just are what we are, and no pills or shots are going to change that.

By the way, I'd recommend the book An Asperger Marriage, by Chris and Gisela Slater-Walker. It gives better insights into Asperger's than I can.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2008, 08:56:32 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.

I don't know what's wrong with me. I don't like to make eye contact with people, I don't get jokes at all (well some, but not the most obvious ones because first I process the joke in my head to a point where I break it down. Then I try to make it sound like a joke but I don't get shit. So it kind of sucks when everyone else is in a different topic and I "get it" 30 minutes later. Though the joke is kind of dumb. I pretend to laugh and get it, when I don't.). I don't cry at funerals, I have litte to no feelings for things. I'm not an asshole, I swear. It's just that I didn't know the person that well, I wasn't that close to that person. Why should I cry? My grandma died when I was 7, but at the time I didn't understand what death was. My uncle died of cancer when I was 13, but I only saw him 3 times a year. Then during his final months we saw him everyday, but he was usually high off his meds and cussing people out so it was a bit hard. So a lot of people were asking me why I didn't cry at the funeral, I was the only one. I didn't like going to the funeral, I was just happy that I didn't have to go to school for a week. That's a really harsh and cold thing to say, but that's honestly how I felt. Trying to fit in, when everone was gone I went beside the body and started talking to it so no one would question my distance.

I associate patterns and colours to help me remember things. I think that's called synesthesia. Except I don't see the colours when someone's talking to me or when I listen to music. Normally I see shapes, patterns, some colours when I listen to music. When I listen to music I see a wave of colour that looks very much like that machine that measures heart beats. So imagine that going to the beat of the song in a specific colour. Sometimes there is no colour. Certain words are shapes, and colours. Like the word "year" for instance. I see an orange oval with black Vs in the middle. Like this:
I would draw more but I kind of don't want to.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2008, 10:30:42 PM »

Bah. I hate this shit. I was diagnosed at 14 and none of the shit I've seen really applies to me, so fuck this. (Sorry, had to let it out.)

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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2008, 03:14:50 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.

I don't know what's wrong with me. I don't like to make eye contact with people, I don't get jokes at all (well some, but not the most obvious ones because first I process the joke in my head to a point where I break it down. Then I try to make it sound like a joke but I don't get shit. So it kind of sucks when everyone else is in a different topic and I "get it" 30 minutes later. Though the joke is kind of dumb. I pretend to laugh and get it, when I don't.). I don't cry at funerals, I have litte to no feelings for things. I'm not an asshole, I swear. It's just that I didn't know the person that well, I wasn't that close to that person. Why should I cry? My grandma died when I was 7, but at the time I didn't understand what death was. My uncle died of cancer when I was 13, but I only saw him 3 times a year. Then during his final months we saw him everyday, but he was usually high off his meds and cussing people out so it was a bit hard. So a lot of people were asking me why I didn't cry at the funeral, I was the only one. I didn't like going to the funeral, I was just happy that I didn't have to go to school for a week. That's a really harsh and cold thing to say, but that's honestly how I felt. Trying to fit in, when everone was gone I went beside the body and started talking to it so no one would question my distance.

I associate patterns and colours to help me remember things. I think that's called synesthesia. Except I don't see the colours when someone's talking to me or when I listen to music. Normally I see shapes, patterns, some colours when I listen to music. When I listen to music I see a wave of colour that looks very much like that machine that measures heart beats. So imagine that going to the beat of the song in a specific colour. Sometimes there is no colour. Certain words are shapes, and colours. Like the word "year" for instance. I see an orange oval with black Vs in the middle. Like this:
I would draw more but I kind of don't want to.

Sean, there are many different types of synesthesia. I have an online friend in Rochester who experiences lexical-gustatory synesthesia, meaning that she can taste words. In fact, I'm going to post a link to a post that she typed on her MySpace blog which has probably the best description of Asperger's that I've ever read...

The Woman Who Fell to Earth

Bah. I hate this shit. I was diagnosed at 14 and none of the shit I've seen really applies to me, so fuck this. (Sorry, had to let it out.)

How old are you now, and why do you feel that none of it applies to you?
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #24 on: May 01, 2008, 04:59:18 PM »

I kinda think maybe too many kids are being diagnosed with stuff when they are just simply 'different'. Kinda scares me a bit thinking how my daughter will go when she gets to school. It just worries me that any sign of individuality in children is seen as a problem.

/random ramble over

Yah seriously. Parents and people are just too worried about their children getting sick or having diseases. It's really annoying. Everyday on the news there's something about a new form of autism, a new form of schizophrenia. Really, is that even necessary. I may have Asperger's syndrome but I don't need therapy and all that jazz that doctors refer to. I'm living quite fine. Maybe some people, but not the whole damn world. It's like we can't take care of ourselves anymore, we may not have a religion to rely on, but we rely on science and therapy to take care of our problems. People need to shut the fuck up, your child is just different. They're not special and neither are you. This is no way directed to you by the way, I'm just saying parents in general.

Somehow, I doubt that you're an Aspie, but I could be wrong.

I don't know what's wrong with me. I don't like to make eye contact with people, I don't get jokes at all (well some, but not the most obvious ones because first I process the joke in my head to a point where I break it down. Then I try to make it sound like a joke but I don't get shit. So it kind of sucks when everyone else is in a different topic and I "get it" 30 minutes later. Though the joke is kind of dumb. I pretend to laugh and get it, when I don't.). I don't cry at funerals, I have litte to no feelings for things. I'm not an asshole, I swear. It's just that I didn't know the person that well, I wasn't that close to that person. Why should I cry? My grandma died when I was 7, but at the time I didn't understand what death was. My uncle died of cancer when I was 13, but I only saw him 3 times a year. Then during his final months we saw him everyday, but he was usually high off his meds and cussing people out so it was a bit hard. So a lot of people were asking me why I didn't cry at the funeral, I was the only one. I didn't like going to the funeral, I was just happy that I didn't have to go to school for a week. That's a really harsh and cold thing to say, but that's honestly how I felt. Trying to fit in, when everone was gone I went beside the body and started talking to it so no one would question my distance.

I associate patterns and colours to help me remember things. I think that's called synesthesia. Except I don't see the colours when someone's talking to me or when I listen to music. Normally I see shapes, patterns, some colours when I listen to music. When I listen to music I see a wave of colour that looks very much like that machine that measures heart beats. So imagine that going to the beat of the song in a specific colour. Sometimes there is no colour. Certain words are shapes, and colours. Like the word "year" for instance. I see an orange oval with black Vs in the middle. Like this:
I would draw more but I kind of don't want to.

Sean, there are many different types of synesthesia. I have an online friend in Rochester who experiences lexical-gustatory synesthesia, meaning that she can taste words. In fact, I'm going to post a link to a post that she typed on her MySpace blog which has probably the best description of Asperger's that I've ever read...

The Woman Who Fell to Earth


I know there's differne't types of synesthesia. Although I've never been diagnosed with anything, I strangely relate to some things that a person with Asperger's would have.

When I was younger I had to see a lot of school counsellors to talk to me because I was very anti-social, shy, and possessed "loner" qualities. I was also very damn violent with other kids. A lot of them said it was just a phase. I was bullied A LOT, so the school had to call my parents in case I became suicidal and that they'd made a decision to put me in counselling to find out what's wrong with me and why kids hated me so much. But none of them said anything, just that I was uber smart and creative and all the other kids weren't as unique as I, that's why I coudln't socialize well with others. I also thought that others experienced the same things I saw in my head so that sort of contributed to the bullying because of the weird shit I saw. But it's not like I was high when I was 6.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2008, 05:30:35 PM »

I'm not qualified to make a diagnosis, but from what you've described, it's possible that you have some form of high-functioning autism. I guess the next question would be, would you want an official diagnosis if that's actually the case?
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2008, 05:46:34 PM »


Oh my lordy! I would love to be diagnosed, then it wouldn't occupy my mind so much. I wouldn't drift away from life so many hours in the day then get punished by nearly every teacher in sight. It would allow me to live and not watch my every move and make sure what I'm doing is normal. Am I talking to loud to this stranger? Am I expressing little or too much emotion? If I was diagnosed I wouldn't have to worry anymore about this.

You wanna know something else? I can taste the colour brown. But that only happens once in a while. Usually when I'm sick, I get this strange coppery taste in the back of my mouth and for some reason Brown pops in my head. It's never green or yellow, it's always Brown. So now I'm going to research some stuff just for the sake of knowing. Maybe I'll ask my doctor what's wrong.
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2008, 06:45:04 PM »

I thought that all I had was low self-esteem before I opened this thread, with a dash of OCD.
Then I opened it
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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #28 on: May 01, 2008, 07:04:39 PM »

Be careful with the self-diagnosis' folks. Obviously Shawn has been through the process, but just because you can "relate" to some of the symptoms doesn't mean you have a particular condition.

I relate to a lot of what Shawn described. But I'd never go as far as to say I have that condition, because I don't have compulsions (i.e. lack of control). That is what truely drives a diagnosis in my opinion...how much control you have over the condition. Do you not make eye contact because it's how you developed socially? Or do you not because to do so causes you extreme physical discomfort, to the point where you have to look away.

I mean, "Socially awkward" might be the term best suited for a lot of this stuff. I know I describe myself as such all the time. Lets not start throwing around a serious condition just to give our uniqueness a name shall we?  :)

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Re: Autism: Unraveling the Mystery
« Reply #29 on: May 01, 2008, 08:08:57 PM »

Be careful with the self-diagnosis' folks. Obviously Shawn has been through the process, but just because you can "relate" to some of the symptoms doesn't mean you have a particular condition.

True, but one should be careful with official diagnoses as well. Despite more and more being uncovered about autism every year, there are still some venues where the mere knowledge that someone has Asperger's (or another ASD) might cause difficulties. For example, I used to post to an Aspie board (until I was banned by the site admin for sticking up for another admin's actions, but that's a different story), and we had several people who were self-diagnosed, but felt that they couldn't afford to go for one, including one guy who, the last I knew, had a job at the US Department of Defense, and felt that he would find himself without a job not long after getting something done officially. No one would really suspect, because he has movie star good looks, and without any makeup necessary! It's not that he felt that they would discriminate against him, but that they would start second-guessing his work and performance solely because he has Asperger's.

Quote
I relate to a lot of what Shawn described. But I'd never go as far as to say I have that condition, because I don't have compulsions (i.e. lack of control). That is what truely drives a diagnosis in my opinion...how much control you have over the condition. Do you not make eye contact because it's how you developed socially? Or do you not because to do so causes you extreme physical discomfort, to the point where you have to look away.

I have a cousin that still has trouble with eye contact, and she's slightly older than I am, and my brother used to flap his hands when he got excited, but I don't think that he's done that in at least 15 years, and it hasn't affected his life as much as it has mine, as when he's discharged from the US Marine Corps on May 12, he will have served about 8 2/3 years. Over his life, my father has displayed behaviors similar to mine, but he didn't have the benefit of an Asperger's diagnosis as a child, and back then, autistic children were often thought of retarded, and locked up in institutions. My father may not be a genius, but he's not an unintelligent man, and has had little issue keeping himself employed most of his adult life, including one job where he was earning about $60K per year just before he retired. I've also heard that aside from being less authoritarian, he was a lot like his father, so I can conceivably trace Asperger's back at least two generations.

Quote
I mean, "Socially awkward" might be the term best suited for a lot of this stuff. I know I describe myself as such all the time. Lets not start throwing around a serious condition just to give our uniqueness a name shall we?  :)

Agreed.
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What is a rebel? A man who says no. - Albert Camus
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