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Author Topic: Mental Arithmetic  (Read 9453 times)

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Kenny Wisdom

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2008, 05:10:42 AM »

 :coolsmiley:

Kovacs, that's BRILLIANT!!!!!!!! I understood that!! I really did!!

Everyone else, thanks also for your erudite contributions.

Len, I think it is obvious by now I would have just been lugging the stones up to the pyramids, not doing the intricate calculations!

CGB...I like your war stories! My pop was Royal Navy but alas not a fighter pilot. He had a brilliant mind, by the way. More reason to believe I was switched at birth...

...we once sat down and had a father/son talk. I got sweaty palms, wondering what was coming...and was relieved when he blurted out, "Son...maybe you should concentrate on something else and forget the maths..."

 :buck2:


PS Anyone want to look at the paper that started off this little thread, it's over here:

http://www.tda.gov.uk/upload/resources/pdf/n/non_interactive_numeracy_benchmark_test.pdf

PPS Are there any English teachers here on the box? That is, not teachers of English, but teachers who are English. If so, would they let themselves be known to me. I have a question.

Thanks.
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Haushinka

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2008, 08:10:57 AM »

My mum is an english teacher who is scottish, but she'll answer your question.

By the way, this thread has just told me everything I need to know- I've forgotten everything I learned in Advanced Higher Maths. I had to think what "Integer" meant. It's just a shmancy word for number!
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Yoshiki Vázquez Baeza.
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Kenny Wisdom

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2008, 08:38:10 AM »

Can you ask dear Mama about entry requirements for teaching - I thought a BA in relevant subject with a PGCE was sufficient, and then there is a requirement to take QTS tests during the PGCE attainment.

A) Some sources say you also have to have GCSE Grade C English & Maths or equivalent as mandatory qualifications - is this definitely the case, or does attainment of my first statement qualify and supercede that requirement?

B) Part A is I believe relevant to teaching primary and secondary education, up to age 18. What is the qualification status required for further or higher education?

Muchas gracias.  angel

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2008, 11:50:36 AM »

OOoh, turns out I can answer this one.
The route I'm taking-
With a relevant degree one can do a 1-year post-grad in teaching. This is geared to what you want to be teaching. For me this will be plain old primary teaching, for others it would be high school geoggers etc (with a relevant degree). You can also do this one year post-grad alongside the degree but it makes for little/no social life. This route is for teachers in Scotland and I would argue is much more straightforward and easy than the english/welsh way.

My mum did her Initial Teachers Training way back in the seveties in Bristol, but the application process remains the same- You need to have passed O-level or GCSE (with a minimum grade C) Maths and English, and a degree in any subject (If not, a teaching degree is available over 3 years). You can get subject training if the degree you hold is not relevant to the subject you want to teach- this usually involves a year at uni/college.
From this point forward you have to choose if you want to be a primary school teacher, secondary or further education. Primary school training is generally full-time only as there is such a shortage of teachers, but secondary and further can be done part time. After completing the training and spending 18/24 weeks in a school, you're qualified and can go and find a job.

My mum didn't have a degree when she started training as a teacher, but more funding is allocated to people who express a wish to become a qualified teacher. I've just been accepted for my Post-Grad (which doesn't start for another 2 years), and it is the easiest way to get a qualification quickly.

The Oxford Poly is the best place to do the ITT (Initial Teachers Training), according to my mum. I don't know if the place still exists.

Past furter education, Higher education teaching places are usually allocated to students who have done well in PhD courses, teachers from schools who are regarded as subject experts, and for 1st year uni courses, to people who have just completed their degree and had a prof who took a shine to them. The salaries for a Uni professor range from £15,000 to £100,000. Whereas a full time state teacher will earn £30,000 (£34,000 in greater london).
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Yoshiki Vázquez Baeza.
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Kovacs

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2008, 08:14:48 PM »

Quote
this table and this thread assumes the use of base 10
I fail to see how that helps, considering almost all math is done using base 10. Yes, lets go hexadecimal, that'll make things nice and simple.  :)
in my head,
i often convert this kind of problem to the base of the denominator,
do the math,
and convert back ...

base 60 or 360 would make some things even simpler then base 16 ...

I admit, that's impressive. You're one of those math folks who used things like spherical coordinates for fun, aren't you?  :)

The only odd thing I do mathmatically is break everything down into 10s. It slows me down a lot. For example, 24 - 8. I first do 24 -4 = 20, then 20 - 4 = 16. Its so much slower to do two operations, but I can't seem to think outside of tens. I've always wondered about a base 8 setup, since it seems everything would divide evenly in more practical applications than base 10.

Quote
Kovacs, that's BRILLIANT!!!!!!!! I understood that!! I really did!!

Glad I could help! I tutored math for about 3 years and miss it terribly, so if you ever have any questions I'd be happy to oblige, if I can.  :)
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85283-071

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2008, 05:30:40 PM »


base 60 or 360 would make some things even simpler then base 16 ...

It amazes me then, that you still cannot, or that you refuse to, properly use the words then and than.
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lentower

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2008, 06:13:42 PM »

i just noticed these two articles on Wikpedia
Mental Calculation and
the Trachtenberg System
(also check out the "See also" sections in both articles.)

i read trachtenberg's book in my teens and learned a few things from it.
(already knew most of it)
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Cheddars Cousin

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2008, 07:35:44 PM »

Tell us some of the things you learned than...

Haushinka

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2008, 07:58:30 PM »

You just can't help yourself, you're really cheesing me off.
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Yoshiki Vázquez Baeza.
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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #24 on: September 06, 2008, 11:57:43 PM »

Don't laugh at this question.
2
4/8 = 3

Three eighths of the class is involved, there are three eighths to twenty four: 8 x 3 = 24, therefore all the students are involved, so the answer to how many are not involved must be........NONE! None are not involved!

Tsk, tk ... menial arithmetic.
Kenny, are you a betting man?  ;) 
Can you bet Euros (or whatever you have there) over the internet?  :coolsmiley:
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85283-071

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2008, 02:58:13 AM »

Tell us some of the things you learned than...

Behold, the power of cheese!
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preferpencil

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2008, 03:09:48 PM »

Does anyone have a minor obsession between counting numbers and language?

I didn't know this until I was grown, but my father is a mathematician and he did something strange to me in the womb.

I started counting syllables by 5's on my fingers very young (when bored) and then it just became easy in my head. So, in effect, start at my "So" and end here. That is either 1 over, or 4 under. Meaning, coming even into the number 5.

I know this is strange. My dad --I learned in my twenties--did this as a boy and later-won bar bets. Only the jerk can count letters in his head instead of syllables. And that is what is called: "dumbing down".
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Devery

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2008, 10:30:17 AM »


I started counting syllables by 5's on my fingers very young (when bored) and then it just became easy in my head. So, in effect, start at my "So" and end here. That is either 1 over, or 4 under. Meaning, coming even into the number 5.


Oh, this is cool!  My favorite number, being 5729, when applied to your forumula, works out as:  5729 = 5.  Perfect!
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Kenny Wisdom

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2008, 10:43:26 AM »

I really don't get this.  :embarassed:

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caju

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Re: Mental Arithmetic
« Reply #29 on: October 16, 2008, 11:37:37 AM »

I really don't get this.  :embarassed:



Really?  I always thought you were more like this....


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