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Author Topic: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?  (Read 10866 times)

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The Angel Raliel

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #45 on: July 04, 2008, 06:31:08 AM »

For some reason swords DO give you more agilty.... I am no dancer or juggler, but give me a pair of swords ( I tend to fight with two ) and I can make them dance! The swords from Heron armouries are very much of the head chopping variety, when I started running sword classes a while back, I bought several swords from different manufacturers, but the Heron ones are by far the best, as they can really take a beating and not fall apart... I made the mistake of buying a few cheap " re-enactment standard " swords that we managed to break in one or two bouts, some we managed to break on the first fight
They may look shiny on the web page but they are actually pretty damn solid....... BTW never buy swords from collectors catalogues! they are genrally only designed for hang on walls... I would recommend a £160 Heron armoury single hander for beginners.... ( something to ask Saint Nicholas for, round about the winter solstice )   Where is the Far Far Away that you are travelling to?
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fishbulb

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #46 on: July 04, 2008, 10:19:58 AM »

I'm travelling far far away to the us of glorious a! 

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Kenny Wisdom

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #47 on: July 04, 2008, 10:31:38 AM »

I think some knight thrusting his sword towards me would make me pretty agile, too.
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CeeGBee

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #48 on: July 04, 2008, 11:27:59 AM »

Did someone say SWORDS?

Firstly, Miss Fishy, I am jealous in the extreme.  One of the great high points in my museum career (which I will
resume if ever the opportunity arises) was the opportunity to hold, at different times, the sabres of Confederate
Generals Robert E. Lee (a finely-decorated custom made presentation blade) and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson
(a standard-issue officer's sword, quite plain).  Both can be seen at the Museum of the Confederacy.  Each sword
 reflected the personality of its owner well, although to be fair, Lee had a more appropriate one for regular duty.

Secondly, Mr. Raliel, is the Heron Armory in any way related to Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" books?  I have seen
swords marketed in those very catalogues under that name, and I suspect the purveyors would be less than pleased
at what might seem an unauthorized use of the licensed brand name.  I second your suggestion against buying such
blades (unless, of course, one wishes for something simply to hang on the wall and look cool...)

As for my own collection...  well, one day it will include a poorly balanced, technologically backward double-edged
straight sword along the 9th-10th century west-European style... hand-made... if I can ever afford it.   :-\
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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #49 on: July 04, 2008, 11:31:11 AM »

I'm travelling far far away to the us of glorious a! 



 :fish: :sign13::usa2::D :love5: :glasses9:

jdfu!

CeeGBee

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #50 on: July 04, 2008, 12:02:51 PM »

I'm travelling far far away to the us of glorious a! 



Don't forget your GPS...  You might get lost.  ;D
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The Angel Raliel

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #51 on: July 04, 2008, 03:58:49 PM »

 
something like this? ..... As to the "Wheel of Time" reference...... ( Robert Jordan rest in peace ) I have a feeling that Heron armouries has been making decent, combat worthy, real swords for a good many years, and any commercial hang on the wall sword replicas that may have been made under that name, probably came after..... I would have to check though.
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fishbulb

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #52 on: July 04, 2008, 05:38:49 PM »

Wow, it's fantastic that you worked in a museum. I organised a little exhibition in the kids section of the library, and there was for instance an little ancient stone cannon ball, from Carcassone, it is so impressive to hold something that old. Somebody made that and held that, centuries and centuries ago. Somebody that is dust now. Yet the cannonball is still there. I would like to know what happened to it between it's being made and me holding it. 

Each sword reflected the personality of its owner well, although to be fair, Lee had a more appropriate one for regular duty.

That's also fascinating. What is "regular duty" for a sword? Wasn't that hacking people into bits?
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CeeGBee

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #53 on: July 04, 2008, 05:58:13 PM »

That, AR, is precisely the sort of blade I had in mind.

...and Ms Fishy, I was fortunate enough to work in a couple of history museums and one historical/archaeological park.
As for "that old", the American Civil War was only about 150 years ago.  Jamestown, the park I worked at, is the site
of the oldest permanent English-speaking settlement in North America...  a whopping 401 years old.  That's pretty much
brand new in your part of the world, isn't it?  We have a few artifacts of the native people who were here before the
Europeans arrived, some as much as 15,000 years old, but aside from stone arrowheads, there isn't much.  Oh, and a guy
a few miles away blew off both his legs and one arm a couple weeks ago while messing with a Civil War artillery shell. 
(He died pretty quickly, and a 15-pound hunk of iron went through his neighbors' roof...)

"Regular duty"for a sword?  Well, a general, particularly the commanding general of the whole army, would rarely be called
upon to actually use his sword to cut someone.  However, there is still the uniform (including sword) that one wears every
day, and then there's the much dressier uniform one wears to fancy dress balls, meetings with the President, and the meeting
where you surrender to the opposing army's commander 'cuz your army just can't fight any more.
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fishbulb

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #54 on: July 06, 2008, 04:31:14 AM »

In a way it's weird how warfare or battle has changed over the years. I sort of noticed this when prince Harry got transported out of Afghanistan after it was leaked he was serving duty there. In the old days, like with the Greeks or the Romans (unless all that was romanticised) the king himself went into battle and lead his army.

401 years old is ... 1607. That's not considered extremely old here no. At one point my aunt and uncle lived in a house from the 15th century (they lived in the center of Maastricht, a really old city, and they had a café there, they lived upstairs from the café) which was so cool to play in as a kid. All these hallways and little stairs and little doors and scary cellars and creaky attics, and levels changing all the time. My uncle was a painter and in one of the darkest rooms he had hung a painting of a bull's slaughtered head with blood dripping from it, I was terrified of that as a kid and we dared each other to go in there when my cousins and I were little.

I am surprised those Civil artillery shells are still explosive after all these years. Accidents like that happen all the time here too, bombs and grenades from the second world war turn up literally several times a week. In the Dutch part of the North Sea alone there are about 50.000 unexploded bombs on the sea floor that sometimes kill people on fishing boats when they get in their nets, so the national bomb squad is dismantling them all.
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CeeGBee

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Re: GPS: godsend, or surrender to one's own ignorance?
« Reply #55 on: July 06, 2008, 12:18:00 PM »

In a way it's weird how warfare or battle has changed over the years. I sort of noticed this when prince Harry got transported out of Afghanistan after it was leaked he was serving duty there. In the old days, like with the Greeks or the Romans (unless all that was romanticised) the king himself went into battle and lead his army.
Harry's presence on the battlefield was a bit of a throwback: a military leader of lofty social status actually in harm's way.
Unfortunately, once his presence was leaked, and he became a specific target, his presence was more of a danger than
an inspiration to the men around him.

401 years old is ... 1607. That's not considered extremely old here no. At one point my aunt and uncle lived in a house from the 15th century (they lived in the center of Maastricht, a really old city, and they had a café there, they lived upstairs from the café) which was so cool to play in as a kid.
The leaders of the 1607 expedition were actually mostly veterans of the Eighty Years War (I suspect you have a better name
for it: the revolt of the Seventeen Provinces against Spanish rule...?)  After that, they sailed to America, and built forts like the
ones they'd built in Europe, to protect their settlement from Spanish attackers (who never appeared).

I am surprised those Civil artillery shells are still explosive after all these years.
Most of them have become inert, but black powder is odd that way...  If it's sealed up really well, with no moisture, it can remain
volatile for a very long time.  This guy apparently assumed that since the shell had been immersed in water for all those years, it
must have become inert...   ...and this, children, is why we don't make assumptions about bombs...
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